Earn your Water Diploma – Enroll at Great Miami U!

Win a gift card to your favorite local brewery or coffee shop

At most universities you pay to learn. At Great Miami U, we’ll pay you (if we pick your name in a drawing of all our graduates). Earning your degree from Great Miami U is free and easy. And better yet, it only takes a few minutes!

The Miami Conservancy District (MCD) is launching the Great Miami Watershed University, or Great Miami U, today as part of the national Value Water campaign to raise awareness about the importance of water and the often invisible water challenges facing our country.

We’re fortunate in this region to have plenty of water. You turn on the faucet and water comes out. It’s hard not to take water for granted when it’s always there for us. But how much do you really know about the region’s water? We’ve got the basics ready for you in a new and fun way to learn.

You can earn your diploma in three easy steps.

  1. Click here to get started.
  2. Watch four 2-minute videos about water.
  3. Take a 4-question exam to test your knowledge.

You will then be registered to win a $100 gift card to the local brewery or coffee shop of our choice. We’ll even email you a diploma to print.

EARN A BONUS CHANCE TO WIN – Take a photo of yourself with your diploma and post to Facebook, Twitter or Instagram with the hashtag #GreatMiamiU and we’ll enter you a second time.

 

Do a little (septic system maintenance) to save a lot!

By Mike Ekberg, manager for water resources monitoring and analysis

If you could spend less than $100 a year to avoid a $7,000 home repair expense, you’d do it wouldn’t you?

Consider this: It only costs about $250 to $500 every three to five years to maintain a septic system. But it can cost up to $7,000 or more to repair or replace it. Plus, a poorly maintained septic system can contaminate groundwater/drinking water and spread disease.

You can’t put a price on the health and safety of your family.

What is a septic system?
Septic systems are highly efficient, self-contained, underground wastewater treatment systems. They are commonly found in rural areas and often consist of a septic tank and a drainfield.

Do you have a septic system? You probably do if:

  • You use well water.
  • The water line coming into your home does not have a meter.
  • Your neighbors have a septic system.

Septic Smart Week
Septic Smart Week is Sept. 14-18. It’s a good time to have your system maintained and review ways to keep your system working well.

Maintain your septic system
Inspect and pump regularly
In general, your septic system should be inspected every one to three years and pumped every three to five years by a certified septic system professional.

Use water efficiently to avoid overloading the system
Consider using high-efficiency toilets and showerheads. When using the washing machine, be sure to select the proper load size to avoid using more water than needed.

Flush with care. Don’t flush anything besides human waste and toilet paper. Never flush:

  • Paints
  • Chemicals
  • Medications
  • Feminine hygiene products
  • Dental floss

Take care at the drain.

  • Never pour cooking oil or grease down the drain.
  • Never pour oil-based paints or solvents down the drain.
  • Eliminate or limit the use of a garbage disposal.
  • Never park or drive on your drainfield.
  • Plant trees an appropriate distance from your drainfield. A septic service professional can help you with the property distance.
  • Keep roof drains, sump pumps and other rainwater drainage systems away from your drainfield areas. Excess water can slow or stop the wastewater treatment process.
  • View these SepticSmart Week Quick Tip videos on the importance of properly using and maintaining your septic system.

Information for this blogpost was taken directly from the Environmental Protection Agency’s “A Homeowner’s Guide to Septic Systems”

Giving the Stillwater River Some Love

By Sarah Hippensteel Hall, Ph.D., manager of watershed partnerships

If you haven’t visited the Stillwater River firsthand, it is time you did. The Stillwater River is a special place to fish, paddle, or just enjoy some beautiful scenery.

Ohio’s only National Water Trail and State Scenic River

Designated as both a National Water Trail and a State Scenic River, the Stillwater River and Greenville Creek system are the only river segments in Ohio that have been awarded both of these special distinctions.

Ohio’s scenic river program recognizes high quality natural streams and helps protect them for future generations. The National Park Service’s National Water Trail program recognizes rivers and streams with plentiful public access for river recreation. Together, that makes the Stillwater River one of the best Ohio has to offer.

Greenville Falls

Premier outdoor recreation 

The Stillwater River and its tributaries offer diverse recreation fun.

  • World-class fishing, including some of Ohio’s premier smallmouth bass habitat
  • 60+ miles of flatwater for beginning and intermediate paddlers
  • Beautiful riverside parks managed by Darke County Park District, Miami County Park District, and Five Rivers MetroParks
  • Fun nature education at Brukner Nature Center in Troy, and Aullwood Audubon in Dayton
  • Scenic waterfalls on Greenville Creek

Stay Safe

And anytime we talk about river adventures, we need to talk about river safety. A few small steps can ensure your next experience on the Stillwater River—or any river for that matter—is a fun and safe one.

  • Do not enter the water when river levels are high or water is moving fast. Most people underestimate the power of water.
  • Always wear a life jacket while paddling.

Use our Stillwater River water trail map to learn more about staying safe on the river.

She is putting on the most important piece of river gear. Always wear a life jacket when paddling the Stillwater River.

The health of the Stillwater River

So the Stillwater River offers exceptional river recreation. But what about the condition of the river?

When Ohio designated the Stillwater River as a Scenic River in 1975, it was considered to be in “excellent” or “good” condition. As with virtually every water body in the country, land uses in recent years threaten the water quality and condition of the habitat. Despite the challenges, the Ohio EPA reports that 52 percent of the Stillwater River and its major tributaries meet Ohio water quality standards.

One of the most common threats to the Stillwater River is nutrients. Nitrogen and phosphorus enter waterways when it rains, impacting water quality. Both are found in fertilizers, animal waste, sewage, and wastewater. These problems can be reduced by fencing livestock out of streams and rivers, better fertilizer management, properly maintaining septic systems, and improvements to wastewater treatment.

The Stillwater River and its tributaries have also been heavily impacted by physical, man-made changes. Removal of stream side forests can increase erosion of the stream banks. When the shape of the stream is changed from a natural, meandering shape to a straight channel, habitat is destroyed.

More than half of the Stillwater River and its tributaries meet Ohio water quality standards.

MCD and the Stillwater River

Keeping rivers healthy is a big part of MCD’s water stewardship efforts. We collaborate with schools, communities and local groups to protect the river. We:

  • Track nutrient and other pollutant levels in the Stillwater River.
  • Sponsor trash cleanups on the river.
  • Educate homeowners on proper maintenance of home sewage treatment systems.
  • Partner with communities that manage wastewater treatment to explore new approaches to wastewater management.

We’re working to keep the Stillwater River healthy for you, your family and generations to come. You can help with these simple water wise actions. Let’s give the Stillwater River some big love in return for all it gives us.

Bike trail and river conditions just a couple clicks away

By Sarah Hippensteel Hall, Ph.D., manager of watershed partnerships

Before you head out on your next cycling or paddling adventure along the Great Miami, be sure to check out bike trail and river conditions. It’s always best to know before you go!

The live Bike Trail and River Conditions Map on the Great Miami Riverway website helps you understand river water levels and whether or not bike trail sections may be under water after rain events. And now, the Riverway has launched a River Water Bacteria Levels Map to provide information on river water quality.

Bike Trail Conditions

It’s always a good idea to check bike trail conditions before you go, especially if we’ve seen rain lately. Some trails are located within the levee systems that protect our cities from high water—and that means trail sections might be under water after rain or storms. You don’t want to leave the comfort of your house only to find out that a section of your favorite trail is covered with water.

The map’s color-coded symbols are set up just like a traffic signal, making it easy to read.

 

 

 

River Conditions

You can also check the river water levels to see if water conditions are appropriate for your experience level.

 

 

 

When paddling, it’s also a good idea to consider:

  • Wind
  • Weather
  • Temperature
  • Floating debris
  • River current
  • Boat size
  • Skill level
  • Ability to launch safely

IF IN DOUBT, DON’T GO OUT.

And keep these safety tips in mind:

  • Always wear a life jacket.
  • Never paddle alone.
  • Tell someone where you are going and when to expect you back.
  • You can find more safety tips here.

River Bacteria Levels – How High Is Unsafe for Recreation?

New to the Great Miami Riverway website is a map that helps river users understand water quality conditions and potential bacteria levels. The map promotes public health and safety by helping you decide when the water is safe to paddle.

 

 

 

Rain events can cause bacteria levels in river water to rise to an unsafe level for human contact. Bacteria can get into the river water from a variety of sources, including pet waste, storm sewers, septic tanks, and farm fields. And that bacteria can make you sick if you swallow any river water.

Using research conducted by the Miami Conservancy District, this Riverway web app estimates the concentration of E. coli bacteria, an indicator of fecal pollution, during different weather conditions. The Ohio EPA advises that recreation waters are unsafe for human contact when E. coli is > 298 colony counts per 100 mL of water.

Using these maps will help ensure your next adventure is not only fun but safe.

Find your way—safely—along the Great Miami Riverway!

This blog is also published on the Great Miami Riverway website.

PFAS Part III — Strategies

By Mike Ekberg, manager of water resources monitoring and analysis

In Part I, we looked at what per- and polyfluorinated alkyl substances, or PFAS, are and why you should care. In Part II, we looked at their presence in local drinking water. In this final post, we look at the strategies for dealing with PFAS.

Per- and polyfluorinated alkyl substances or PFAS are a group of manufactured chemicals widely used in consumer products such as cookware, paper wrappers for fast food, stain repellants, and fire-fighting foams. These chemicals gained widespread attention nationally as well as locally when they began to be detected in the drinking water of some public water systems.

A lack of a cohesive nationwide approach for determining appropriate PFAS levels and actions has resulted in a wide range of state standards for different PFAS compounds. This adds to the confusion for consumers trying to determine how much PFAS in their drinking water is safe.

Three strategies for dealing with emerging contaminants
It’s likely that chemicals, such as PFAS, originating from consumer products will continue to be detected in natural waters as well as treated drinking water. It’s also likely that as consumers of public drinking water, we will continue to prefer that these types of chemicals not be present in our drinking water. With that in mind, here are three strategies that could help.

Credit: ept.ca/features/environmental-compliance-new-tsca/

1. Study chemicals in the marketplace and replace toxic substances with less toxic alternatives

It’s estimated that approximately 2,000 new chemicals are introduced into the U.S. market each year. Few of these chemicals are evaluated for their toxicity and potential environmental impacts in a timely manner.

The Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) requires USEPA to evaluate new chemicals for safety, but historically, the agency did not have the necessary authority or resources to keep up with this task.

Congress recognized these deficiencies and, in 2016, it passed the Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act. The act made some important improvements to the process for ensuring safety of chemicals in the marketplace.

Key provisions of the act:

  • Mandates safety reviews for chemicals in active commerce.
  • Requires a safety finding for new chemicals before they can enter the market.
  • Replaces TSCA’s burdensome, cost-benefit safety standard—which prevented the EPA from banning asbestos—with a pure, health-based safety standard.
  • Explicitly requires protection of vulnerable populations like children and pregnant women.

The act, however, only required USEPA to begin risk evaluations on 20 chemicals within the first three–and-a-half years of its implementation. Twenty is a very small number when compared to the number of new chemicals entering the market each year. If we can reduce or prevent chemicals that have a high potential of impacting water quality from entering the marketplace, we will have done our water resources a great service.

2. Source water protection is more important than ever

All too often decisions about how to develop land over sensitive aquifers and in close proximity to municipal wellfields are made without appropriate consideration about how the development and activities taking place on that development could impact water quality.

As consumers of public drinking water, we expect that our local governments and public water utilities engage in vigorous efforts to protect their supply of water. This means that economic development plans and activities must align with protection of our source of drinking water.

This alignment implies that some areas over sensitive water resources are not suitable for certain types of development that could pollute or threaten good water quality. A well thought out and proactive source water protection plan is the key to making this happen.

Granular activated carbon Credit: wilsonemi.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/gac-beaker.jpeg

3. Investment in advanced water treatment may be needed

Public expectations often drive investment in new technologies. As new analytical methods lower thresholds for detecting contaminants, water utilities and regulatory agencies will have to deal with the discovery of new chemicals in water. While the concentrations may be extremely small, community members will most likely feel safer if these chemicals are not found in their drinking water.

Water utilities may be faced with the decision to provide advanced water treatment, such as membrane filtration and granular activated carbon filtration, but this level of treatment can be expensive and could raise water rates.

MCD – Helping our region to be water resilient
The Miami Conservancy District (MCD) is committed to helping our region successfully respond to the water challenges that chemicals such as PFAS present to the water resiliency of our communities.

At the request of Congressman Mike Turner, MCD and a group of community and business leaders retained a consultant to assess the City of Dayton’s public water system and all interconnected utilities.

MCD is also working with the United States Geological Survey to evaluate the occurrence of PFAS in groundwater outside of the Dayton metro area. These efforts will help our region protect water for now and into the future.

Part II — PFAS and our water

In Part I, we looked at what per- and polyfluorinated alkyl substances, or PFAS, are and why you should care. In Part II, we look at the impact to our drinking water.

Per- and polyfluorinated alkyl substances or PFAS are a group of manufactured chemicals widely used in consumer products such as cookware, pizza boxes, stain repellants, and fire-fighting foams. These chemicals gained widespread attention nationally as well as locally when they began to be detected in the drinking water of some public water systems.

New analytical methods open a Pandora’s Box
Over the past couple of decades, new analytical techniques have emerged that make it possible to detect contaminants in water at concentrations as low as parts per trillion. The emergence of these new analytical methods led to the discovery of previously undetectable contaminants in natural waters as well as treated drinking water.

Because of these new capabilities, the scientific community began to discover many of the chemicals that are used in common household consumer products, as well as in pharmaceuticals, were also present at low concentrations in many rivers, streams, and aquifers all over the world. Some of these chemicals were also detected in treated drinking water.

PFAS was one of the groups of these chemicals detected in both natural waters and treated drinking water. The discovery of previously undetectable contaminants in drinking water has prompted questions by public water system operators nationwide. How do you communicate health risks for a contaminant when there is no regulated drinking water standard with which to compare? Does the public expect that none of these compounds will be present in drinking water? How does everyday exposure to these compounds from consumer products compare to exposure from drinking water?

PFAS present in the waters of the Miami Valley
PFAS is here, too. Rivers and streams in the Miami Valley likely contain low levels of some PFAS compounds. Studies have shown that most municipal wastewater effluent contains low levels of PFAS. (Margot, J., Ross, L., Barry, D.A., and Holliger, C., 2015)

A study conducted by MCD in 2010 and 2011 found low levels of the PFAS compound PFOS present in 22 out of 31 river, stream, and aquifer sampling sites. The same study also found PFOS in two out of two wastewater treatment plant outfalls sampled.

More recently, PFAS compounds were detected in the treated drinking water at Wright Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) and at the City of Dayton. According to the Dayton Daily News (March 11, 2020), the PFAS is thought to have originated from the use of foams during fire-fighting training activities. PFAS from the foams may have leached into the underlying aquifer and traveled to nearby water supply wells. PFAS concentrations at WPAFB were high enough that a granular activated carbon filtration system was required to reduce concentrations to acceptable levels. Meanwhile the levels of PFAS in the Dayton public water system have remained low enough that additional treatment has not been necessary.

Federal and state regulatory agencies struggle to coordinate PFAS response
Determining consistent health guidelines for levels of PFAS in drinking water has been a struggle for federal and state regulatory agencies. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) published its PFAS action plan in February 2019. Under the plan, USEPA committed to developing maximum contaminant levels for two commonly detected PFAS compounds, PFOA and PFOS. The agency will also designate PFOA and PFOS as hazardous substances and begin a national monitoring program to examine the occurrence of PFAS compounds in drinking water.

Prior to the federal PFAS action plan, some states elected to set their own drinking water standards for PFAS as public pressure to do something about these contaminants mounted. Ohio EPA adopted the USEPA health advisory level of 70 parts per trillion. Ohio also developed a PFAS action plan for drinking water in December 2019. The objectives in include:

  • Gather and provide sampling data from specific types of public water systems to determine if PFAS is present in raw and finished drinking water.
  • Assist private water system owners with guidelines and resources to identify and respond to potential PFAS contamination.
  • Establish action levels for drinking water systems in Ohio to aid in appropriately responding to PFAS contamination for the protection of public health.

More information on the Ohio PFAS action plan for drinking water is available at https://epa.ohio.gov/pfas.

In PFAS Part III we’ll look at strategies for dealing with PFAS.

References
Margot, J., Ross, L., Barry, D.A., and Holliger, C., 2015. A review of the fate of
micropollutants in wastewater treatment plants. 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.,
WIREs Water 2015. doi: 10.1002/wat2.1090.

Ismail Turay, Jr., (2020), ‘Ohio EPA to begin testing for ‘forever’ chemicals in drinking water,’ Dayton Daily News, 11 March.

PFAS Part I — the forever chemicals

By Mike Ekberg, manager of water resource monitoring and analysis

You’ve probably heard about PFAS, but what are they and why are they such a hot topic today?

Amazing chemicals
PFAS or per- and polyflouroalkyl substances are a group of chemicals developed in the 1940s that can repel water, dirt, and grease; tolerate high temperatures; make fabrics stain resistant; and can be used to extinguish fires. They are nearly indestructible and last for a really long time. According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, there are nearly 5,000 PFAS compounds in existence today.

Widely used in consumer products
PFAS are widely used in consumer products such as cookware, pizza boxes and stain repellants. The properties of PFAS make them well suited for the creation of nonstick cookware surfaces, water resistant fabrics, stain resistant carpets, and for use in some firefighting foams. These products are popular with consumers but the PFAS chemicals used in their production are bad for the environment.

 

Credit: Grand Valley State University http://www.gvsu.edu/pfas/

PFAS are bad news for the environment
Unfortunately, some of the same properties that make PFAS valuable in manufacturing, make them bad news for clean air, soil and water. The chemical bonds that hold PFAS molecules together make them highly resistant to breaking down in the natural environment. Once they get into soil and water, they persist for very long periods of time. Because PFAS are so persistent, they can buildup (bioaccumulate) in fish and wildlife. They can also accumulate in the blood and serum of people. Studies have shown that low levels of PFAS are commonly present in municipal wastewater sludge and effluent as well in many rivers and streams where treated or untreated human sewage is discharged. The issue of PFAS in the environment is not going to go away anytime soon.

Widespread exposure to PFAS in the U.S. population
Humans can be exposed to PFAS by consuming PFAS-contaminated food and water or by using products that contain PFAS.

Studies have shown widespread exposure of PFAS in humans. (link to study Fourth National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals, Updated Tables). Yet, no one knows for sure the effects on human health, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Human health effects uncertain
Studies of laboratory animals given large doses of PFAS have found that some PFAS may affect growth and development, reproduction, thyroid function, the immune system, and injure the liver. Epidemiologic studies have examined a number of health effects and associated exposure to some PFAS compounds with the following:

  • High cholesterol
  • Increased liver enzymes
  • Decreased vaccination response
  • Cancer
  • Thyroid disorders
  • Adverse reproductive and developmental effects

Nonetheless, more research is needed to better assess human health effects from exposure to PFAS. For more information on human health related effects of PFAS and what people can do to minimize exposure to these compounds visit Ohio EPA’s PFAS webpage.

PFAS what’s next?
Science is working to better understand how PFAS interacts with the human body and what levels of exposure are safe. Meanwhile industry is phasing out certain PFAS chemicals and replacing them with others. Whether these new PFAS compounds are safer is unknown.

A lack of coherent policies and standards for PFAS in drinking water at the federal level has, in many cases, led to state regulatory agencies adopting their own standards. This has led to a hodgepodge of different drinking water standards for various PFAS chemicals across the country.

Public water systems with PFAS in their source water find themselves in the unenviable position of having to make decisions without federal guidance as to which standards they should apply and what treatment options are most cost effective and ensure consumer safety. The way forward on this issue remains a work in progress.

Most manufactured chemicals we use end up in the environment
Perhaps the most striking point in dealing with the issue of PFAS in the environment is these compounds are a reminder to us all that most manufactured chemicals we use as consumers end up in the natural environment in one way or another.

Our consumer-driven society creates strong incentives to create new chemical compounds in manufacturing and industry each year. Yet, our knowledge of the ultimate fate of these compounds and their potential impacts on human health and the environment is often sorely lacking.

In Part II,  I’ll take a closer look at the issue of PFAS in source waters for public drinking water systems and how this issue is being addressed at the national, state, and local levels.

One simple act can lead to a safe summer on the water

By Sarah Hippensteel Hall, manager of watershed partnerships

The Great Miami, Stillwater, and Mad rivers offer many paddling, rowing, and power boating opportunities. Our water trail maps take you to public access sites and give you safety information. And one simple act can help you have a safe summer on the water.

Wear your life jacket!

 

It’s that simple. The facts are clear:

  • Four out of every five boating deaths in 2018 were due to drowning.
  • 84 percent of drowning victims in recreational boating accidents were not wearing a life jacket.

Having a life jacket in your boat isn’t enough. You have to wear it. Accidents can happen much too fast to reach for a stowed life jacket, so WEAR IT!

As you prepare for the boating/paddling season remember to:

  • Make sure your life jacket is U.S. Coast Guard approved.
  • Double check that your life jacket is appropriate for your favorite water activities. Read the label!
  • Take the time to ensure a proper fit. A life jacket that is too large or too small can cause different situational problems.
  • Check that your life jacket is in good condition, with no tears or holes.
  • Life jackets meant for adult-sized people do not work for children. If you are boating with children, make sure they are wearing properly fitted, child-sized life jackets based on their weight. Do not buy a life jacket for your child to “grow into.”

Modern life jackets are much more comfortable, lightweight and stylish than the bulky orange version. There are so many life jackets to choose from, there’s simply no excuse not to wear one. There are even life jackets that use inflatable technologies so you can remain cool and comfortable. Some will inflate automatically when immersed in water.

A good life jacket is critical to your safety. There are other steps to take as well. Before heading out for a day on the water, be sure to review the safety tips on the back of our maps.

COVID-19 considerations

COVID-19 is part of our lives for now and needs to be considered when boating, too. Maintain good hand washing and don’t go boating if someone in your household is sick. Be sure to review these tips for navigating social distancing  while boating and tips for cleaning and storing your life jacket.

National Safe Boating Week is May 16-22.
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Where does the Miami Valley get its water?

MCD has created a new series of videos about the importance of water. Many people in the Miami Valley don’t know where our water comes from, how it’s replenished or the ways water is used beyond our daily life activities. They don’t know what an aquifer is or how it works. Or how many industries rely on groundwater and how high-quality water helps drive our economy.

We created these videos to explain all of that and more. Help us spread the word by sharing this first video with friends and family. The more people know about the aquifer, the more they will care about it and our water.

Together, we can protect our water.

 

Protecting in all kinds of conditions

By Mike Ekberg, manager of water resources monitoring and analysis

The US Postal Service is often lauded for delivering the mail in all kinds of weather—rain, snow, sleet, etc. But delivering, or in our case, protecting, in bad weather is kind of our thing. And for the past two weekends, our staff took it to another level, protecting our communities while following the necessary guidelines in place due to COVID-19.

“The river went up extremely quickly, and staff monitored the situation and responded—some during the middle of the night—with timely flood gate closures and well readings,” says Janet Bly, MCD general manager, of the March 19-23 high water event. “Staff members are following the workplace guidelines necessary due to the COVID-19 situation while still doing the critically important job of protecting communities from flooding.”

The hydrology team drove separately to the gages to collect stream measurements, says Krystal Lacy, lead worker. Since the team members can’t wash their hands in the field, the hydro techs made sure to use lots of hand sanitizer between locations and kept distance between one another. And they made sure to wipe down the vehicles, she says.

Water rushing through the Germantown Dam conduits.


High water facts and figures for the March 19-23 high-water event:

  • An average of 2.5 inches of rain fell throughout the Miami Valley between 8 a.m. March 18 and 8 a.m. March 20.
  • At peak storage, our five flood protection dams together stored a total of 6.8 billion gallons of water, which ranks 95th on MCD’s list of largest high water events.
  • The peak pool stage at Germantown Dam reached 42.4 feet, which ranks 24th on the list of highest pool stages at the dam.

High water facts and figures for the March 28-29 high-water event:

  • Between 0.75 and 3.25 inches of rain fell throughout the Miami Valley March 28 and 29.
  • At peak storage, our five flood protection dams together stored a total of about 6.5 billion gallons of water, which ranks 102nd on MCD’s list of largest high water events.
  • Lockington Dam recorded its 15th highest pool stage at 28.8 feet.

MCD has recorded seven high water events so far in 2020, with the dams together storing water 25 times this year.

How much water flowed through Germantown Dam?
Earlier this week, a resident asked how much water was flowing through Germantown Dam conduits during the high water event. We thought you might be interested, too.

Peak outflow at Germantown during the high water event over the March 21 weekend was 7,000 cubic feet of water per second, equaling about 3.1 million gallons per minute or 188.5 million gallons per hour.

“I just love that dam and it really works,” the resident wrote, “And they didn’t have any computers, just slide rulers (when it was built).”