Groundwater Guardian Green Sites — an ounce of prevention

By Sarah Hippensteel Hall, Ph.D., manager for watershed partnerships

Most of us go to some lengths to protect our health. We may have an annual physical to catch issues early because we know how hard it can be to fix something once it’s broken.

The same is true of our aquifer – the underground source of this region’s drinking water.

Unlike a heart that can be transplanted, we can’t replace the aquifer. Once it’s broken (contaminated), it can be enormously expensive to fix and sometimes can be beyond repair.

An ounce of prevention really is worth a pound of cure – and more – when it comes to the aquifer.

That’s why the Goundwater Guardian Green Site designation is a program we actively encourage for groups within our 4,000-square-mile Great Miami River Watershed.

Green Site designation helps promote and protect our groundwater by recognizing organizations that are good groundwater stewards and encouraging them to install more groundwater-friendly practices.

MCD sponsors organizations that apply for Green Site designation, pays their Green Site administrative fees for two years, and reimburses organizations up to $2,000 for installing new groundwater-friendly practices.

MCD encourages new projects that protect groundwater and are located over the Buried Valley Aquifer, are located near source water areas, show measurable results, and function over a long period of time.

Share your ground-water friendly practices

The Green Site program recognizes efforts to implement, measure, and document groundwater-friendly practices related to chemical use, water use, pollution prevention, and more. Green spaces, including nature centers, education campuses, parks, golf courses, and farms have been designated Green Sites by the Groundwater Foundation

To be eligible, land managers document the environmental impact of their groundwater-friendly practices, such as:

  • Pounds of fertilizer saved annually by using hardier plants.
  • Gallons of water saved annually by using drought-tolerant plant materials.
  • Amounts of toxic substances disposed of properly, and other related items.

The Groundwater Foundation first named MCD a Groundwater Guardian Green Site in 2010. MCD’s designation covers all of its dams and flood protection features in the cities it protects, covering more than 1,780 acres.

Since 2011, MCD has assisted many communities in earning Green Site designations. Won’t you join us?

Contact me at shippensteel@mcdwater.org with questions or if you need help completing the application.

Simple septic system steps save money and mess

By Mike Ekberg, Manager for Water Resources Monitoring and Analysis

None of us wants to throw thousands of dollars down the drain or put our family’s health at risk. But if you have a septic system and don’t maintain it, you could be doing just that.

It costs only $250 to $300 every four years to maintain your septic system. But repairing or replacing a broken septic system can cost $3,000 to $7,000. And just as important, a poorly maintained septic system can contaminate groundwater/drinking water and spread disease.

What is a septic system?
Septic systems are highly efficient, self-contained, underground wastewater treatment systems. They are commonly found in rural areas and often consist of a septic tank and a drainfield.

septic-system-graphic

Do you have a septic system?

Twenty-five percent of U.S. homes have a septic system. How do you know if you do? Here are some signs:

  • You use well water.
  • The waterline coming into your home doesn’t have a meter.
  • Your neighbors have a septic system.

How to maintain your septic system

Inspect and pump regularly: Your septic system should be inspected and pumped every three to five years by a certified septic system professional.

Use water efficiently to avoid overloading the system: Consider using high-efficiency toilets and showerheads. When using the washing machine, be sure to select the proper load size to avoid using more water than needed.

Flush with care: Don’t flush anything besides human waste and toilet paper. Never flush:

  • Paintssepticsmart-week4
  • Chemicals
  • Medications
  • Feminine hygiene products
  • Dental floss

Take care at the drain

  • Never pour cooking oil or grease down the drain.
  • Never pour oil-based paints or solvents down the drain.
  • Eliminate or limit the use of a garbage disposal.

Maintain your drainfield

  • Never park or drive on your drainfield.
  • Plant trees an appropriate distance away from your drainfield. A septic service professional can advise you on the proper distance.
  • Keep roof drains, sump pumps and other rainwater drainage systems away from your drainfield area. Excess water can slow or stop the wastewater treatment process.

Information for this blogpost was taken directly from EPA’s “A Homeowner’s Guide to Septic Systems” and Groundwater Foundation materials.